Historic Buildings, People & Things in Atlanta History

August 27, 2014

The Todd Family Homestead

The First Todd Family home Built in 1823 - It Burned Down in 1910 - Phototgraph Courtesy of Romona Liddell

This is the first of three articles about early Atlanta Pioneers Richard and Martha Todd, their family and remnant traces of their early presence in the Atlanta area. The second article is about the Todd cemetery, and the third is about Todd Road. Check back soon for the following articles. It is generally accepted that Hardy Ivy and his family were the first people of European descent who settled in what is now the city of Atlanta. Hardy Ivy Park, at the intersection of Peachtree St. and Baker St. in downtown Atlanta memorializes this early pioneer. Not a trace of …continue reading

The Todd Family Homestead

The First Todd Family home Built in 1823 - It Burned Down in 1910 - Phototgraph Courtesy of Romona Liddell

This is the first of three articles about early Atlanta Pioneers Richard and Martha Todd, their family and remnant traces of their early presence in the Atlanta area. The second article is about the Todd cemetery, and the third is about Todd Road. Check back soon for the following articles. It is generally accepted that Hardy Ivy and his family were the first people of European descent who settled in what is now the city of Atlanta. Hardy Ivy Park, at the intersection of Peachtree St. and Baker St. in downtown Atlanta memorializes this early pioneer. Not a trace of …continue reading

The Erskine Memorial Fountain

The Erskine Memorial Fountain in Grant Park - History Atlanta 2014

“Let it be sacredly guarded and cared for by those charged with the responsibility of municipal government,” said Atlanta Mayor Porter King, when the city received the Erskine Memorial Fountain in early May of 1896. If you’re not aware, it is now falling apart. So WTF? That WTF is directed at all of the City of Atlanta governments, both past and present, with a few exceptions, and not just at the regime of Mayor Kasim Reed. It’s a problem his office inherited, stretching into the past more than a century, when the Erskine Memorial Fountain was first abandoned by our …continue reading

The 6th Annual Frontier Faire at Fort Daniel

Learn About Frontier Life & The Cool Weapons at The Fort Daniel 6th Annual Frontier Faire - Photograph by Robert Coffey

Are you a reenactment fanatic? Or maybe you love archaeology, and want to see how the latest and greatest technology is uncovering secrets from the past? Well coming up next month you can satisfy both needs, and provide a wonderful and educational outing for the kids. It’s the 6th Annual Frontier Faire on Saturday, September 20th, 2014 at the Fort Daniel site, located at 2505 Braselton Road, Hog Mountain, Georgia. The Fort Daniel Foundation and Gwinnett Archaeological Research Society (a chapter of the Society for Georgia Archaeology SGA) hosts this event every year. This year the theme is the Bicentennial …continue reading

Past Pictures: Lemuel P. Grant

Lemuel Pratt Grant in the 1880's or 1870's - born in 1817 and Died in 1893 - Georgia State University Library

Our Past Pictures Series examines a string of images from the history of Atlanta. For this edition we look at images associated with Lemuel P. Grant, timely since the 150th anniversary of the Battle of Atlanta is upon us, which started on July 22nd, 1864. Lemuel Pratt Grant is considered one of the founding fathers of the city of Atlanta. Born in Maine in 1817, he came to Atlanta before it was Atlanta with the railroads in the early 1840′s. Like other company men that came with the railways, such as the patriarch of the Peters family that built Ivy Hall, …continue reading

Doll’s Head Trail at Constitution Lakes

A Doll Head in a Old Television - Constitution Lakes Park - History Atlanta 2014

In southeast Atlanta lies a nature preserve unlike any other in Georgia. Doll’s Head Trail at Constitution Lakes Park is part wildlife refuge, part hiking trail, part snake pit and part art exhibit. The land has been transformed by both humans and the flooding South River into an ecological sanctuary smack in the middle of an industrial district. It’s called Doll’s Head Trail because of the in situ artwork created with trash, many of it doll heads, that is left over after the South River floods. At the center of the park lies two small lakes that were formerly excavation …continue reading

Past Pictures: Tenth Street

10th Street around Peachtree in Midtown Atlanta Georgia on February 26th, 1966 - Georgia State University Library

In our Past Pictures series we present a chain of images from the history of Atlanta with one thing in common. For this series we look at Tenth Street. Each picture is presented to spark conversation and memories about the areas you see in each vision of the past. In short, this series is meant to meander through history, much like how our city streets curve and change names. This time we look at Past Pictures of Tenth Street, an interesting corridor that stretches from Monroe Drive on the east before ending right after Brady Avenue on the west. Its …continue reading

APC Alert: The Atlanta Cyclorama

The Atlanta Cyclorama & Civil War Museum - Courtesy of M.H. Mitchell

The Atlanta Preservation Center (APC) released an Advocacy Alert regarding the Atlanta Cyclorama and Civil War Museum located in Grant Park. Faced with various problems in keeping this incredible resource of Atlanta history available to the public since it was donated to the city in 1898 (mostly problems with deterioration and upkeep) today the Cyclorama faces a new crisis. City officials are considering relocation of the painting to another site. Rumors have swirled in preservation circles recently regarding this landmark. Zoo Atlanta could certainly use the land and the space which some estimates place upwards of $20 million. What entity …continue reading

Rhodes Memorial Hall

Rhodes Memorial Hall Built in 1904 on Peachtree Street in Midtown Atlanta - History Atlanta 2014

It was built for Amos Giles Rhodes, one of the first large-scale furniture magnates to market reasonably-priced furniture to the middle class. His innovative desire to modernize the old-school furniture business (he was also one of the first furniture retailers to offer payment installment plans) is similar to how he approached his new mansion on Peachtree Street. Despite the old fashioned look of a medieval castle, the home was a marvel of modern electric technology. The result was “Le Réve” (French for “The Dream”) which is today known as Rhodes Hall or Rhodes Memorial Hall, currently home to the 800-pound gorilla …continue reading

The Henry Heinz Murder

Henry C. Heinz around 1940 - IUPUI University Library Special Collections and Archives

It was a Tuesday night in September of 1943 when Henry Heinz captured his man. For nearly three years someone had been breaking into his Mediterranean-style mansion on Ponce in the evenings, many times while he was still awake, sneaking around and stealing cash from one of his many wallets or his wife’s purse. He vowed to catch the thieving devil, even offering his neighborhood patrolmen a reward of $100 if they captured him. But each time the intruder would slip away undetected into the Druid Hills neighborhood. Not that Tuesday night. He finally had his man. Unfortunately it would …continue reading

Atlanta Fire Station No. 19

Atlanta Fire Station 19 in 1925 - Photo Courtesy of Fire Station 19

It represents the Atlanta Fire Department with their commitment to timely duty along with the history of the charming neighborhood it serves. It is the oldest operating fire station in the city of Atlanta, helping the residents of Virginia-Highland since the 1920′s. But now Atlanta Fire Station No. 19 needs our help. Before we talk about the history, let’s talk about the plans to restore and preserve this piece of Atlanta history. The firemen are seeking help through donations. A plan is in place to restore the arched truck bay door, update the living quarters, fix water damage and return the …continue reading

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