Historic Buildings, People & Things in Atlanta History

February 12, 2016

The Grady Hospital

Horse-drawn Ambulance in 1896 Atlanta for Grady Hospital - Possibly the ambulance that rushed Baker Bass to Grady, which is in the background on the left - Georgia State University Libary

Behold the cornerstone of one of the largest health systems in the world. Grady Health first opened the front doors of this building as The Grady Hospital on June 2nd, 1892 to serve the Atlanta public. It was the first of its kind in the city. It sits on the corner of Jesse Hill Jr. and Coca-Cola Place, an old-school piece of architecture in the middle of a hospital campus that features (for the most part) building designs stacked together like different colored Legos. Its towering old-world silhouette stands out in this modern environment. When you approach the three-story building, …continue reading

The Grady Hospital

Horse-drawn Ambulance in 1896 Atlanta for Grady Hospital - Possibly the ambulance that rushed Baker Bass to Grady, which is in the background on the left - Georgia State University Libary

Behold the cornerstone of one of the largest health systems in the world. Grady Health first opened the front doors of this building as The Grady Hospital on June 2nd, 1892 to serve the Atlanta public. It was the first of its kind in the city. It sits on the corner of Jesse Hill Jr. and Coca-Cola Place, an old-school piece of architecture in the middle of a hospital campus that features (for the most part) building designs stacked together like different colored Legos. Its towering old-world silhouette stands out in this modern environment. When you approach the three-story building, …continue reading

The Baker Bass Murder

Baker A. Bass Who Was Gunned Down on an Atlanta street in 1895 - He ran a fence for stolen goods in the city - His murder revealed police corruption - Atlanta Constitution Rendering from September 1st, 1895

It started as a typical morning for Baker A. Bass. He awoke and left his home at 74 Ellis Street at the regular time. Bass walked to work at four in the morning everyday to open his shop the Babb Commision Company at 113 Peters Street. He would always dress and leave quickly, having his breakfast delivered to work by one of his four children or his wife. She said Baker said goodbye and left the family home on the morning of August 30th, 1895 in a great mood. Bass had a typical route he walked and that dawn was …continue reading

Fort X

Top: A possible image of Fort X aka Fort Hood in 1864 which was on Marietta Street Bottom: The site of Fort X in 2014 - U.S. Library of Congress & History Atlanta

Time and time again we see large Atlanta organizations go silent on properties with historical significance they obtain. My guess is fear of internal plans being interrupted by public outcry is most likely to blame. But that’s just a guess. History repeats itself. We are seeing it again with the treatment of Fort X, aka Fort Hood. The Georgia Institute of Technology obtained the property at 793 Marietta Street in 2012, and repeated requests to Georgia Tech’s public relations team have failed to reveal the plans for the former site of this Confederate fort (it sucks being ignored by three people). Today Fort X …continue reading

Happy Thanksgiving from History Atlanta

Man holding an axe, looking down at turkeys - November 1940 - Georgia State University Archives

Happy Thanksgiving from your friends at History Atlanta. We hope you are having fun with family and friends. Here are a few very random images to check out in between (hopefully) healthy helpings of turkey. And speaking of turkey, check out the first image, taken at some point in November 1940. Pretty awesome… unless you’re a turkey. The envelope did not include where exactly the image was taken. Gobble gobble! Above are the Swanee River Boys, a gospel quartet that made noise (pun intended) in the 1940’s. From left to right you have George Hughes, brothers Buford Abner and Merle …continue reading

Todd Road

Intersection of Todd Road and Virginia Avenue in the heart of the Virginia Highland neighborhood in Atlanta, GA - In the background is Murphy’s, a popular restaurant - Ray Keen 2014

This is the last of three articles about early Atlanta Pioneers Richard and Martha Todd, their family, and remnant traces of their early presence in the Atlanta area. The first article was about the Todd Homestead, and the second article was about the Todd Cemetery. If you look at a map of the Virginia-Highland area, it is plain to see that it is a planned development with streets laid out mostly in even grids. Near the main intersection of Virginia and Highland Avenues, however, a street called Todd Road cuts at an odd angle for a few blocks across the …continue reading

Atlanta Cemeteries Part 3

Scottdale Has Parts that are Overgrown Like Here and Parts That Are Maintained by James Robertson - History Atlanta 2014

Just in time for Halloween here are a few more Atlanta graveyards. For Atlanta Cemeteries Part 1 we explored Thomasville Cemetery, Alsobrook Family Cemetery and Sylvester Cemetery. Atlanta Cemeteries Part 2 looked at the Todd Family Cemetery, Harmony Grove Cemetery and Historic Sardis Cemetery. This Atlanta Cemeteries Part 3 focuses on Scottdale Cemetery, its neighbor Washington Memorial Gardens and Peachtree Baptists Church Cemetery. Scottdale Mills Cemetery First Recorded Burial: Unknown – Before the Civil War? How Many Burials: More than 150 Location: 2849 Jordan Oaks Lane, Decatur, GA 30033 (to the east of the two condo units) History of the Cemetery & Other Notes: The past of …continue reading

Atlanta Cemeteries Part 2

A Krause Headstone from Harmony Grove Cemetery - History Atlanta 2014

Just in time for Halloween here are a few Atlanta graveyards. This Part 2 looks at the Todd Family Cemetery, Harmony Grove Cemetery and Historic Sardis Cemetery. For Atlanta Cemeteries Part 1 we explored Thomasville Cemetery, Alsobrook Family Cemetery and Sylvester Cemetery. Be sure to check out Atlanta Cemeteries Part 1. Atlanta Cemeteries Part 3 explores Scottdale Cemetery, Washington Memorial Gardens and Peachtree Baptist Church. Scottdale is an old mill town cemetery. Washington is an African American cemetery with old slave burials. Peachtree Baptist Church is a typical Victorian cemetery, with intricate headstones and an old-world atmosphere.  Todd Family Cemetery is a …continue reading

Atlanta Cemeteries Part 1

Thomasville Cemetery - History Atlanta 2014

In celebration of Halloween we have traveled out to several Atlanta cemeteries to not only record their current state, but to explore the history behind these graveyards. For Part 1 of this series we explored Thomasville Cemetery, Alsobrook Family Cemetery and Sylvester Cemetery. Atlanta Cemeteries Part 2 looks at the Todd Family Cemetery, Harmony Grove Cemetery and Historic Sardis Cemetery. Todd Family Cemetery is a burial ground in the backyard of Virginia-Highland residence. Harmony Grove Cemetery is a restored graveyard in Buckhead with a diverse history. Sardis Church Cemetery has been maintained wonderfully by its sister church. Atlanta Cemeteries Part …continue reading

The Carnegie Library Stones

Many of the Decorations for the Carnegie Library now Reside in an Atlanta City Property that Served as Dumping Grounds - History Atlanta 2014

It was a weeknight in May 2014 when I was introduced to the Carnegie Trail. Since that evening trespassing signs have gone up and police will write tickets to trespassers. So if you head out there, just know you have been warned. We were lucky, able to walk and take pictures of this city-owned land in DeKalb County without the threat of fines. My hiking companions from the Atlanta Preservation Center were still in office clothes. I felt prepared for the walk, wearing walking shoes and camouflage cargo shorts. Our two guides, animator Joe Peery and his friend Joel Slaton, were two of …continue reading

The Switchyards Building

Rendering of the Switchyards Building Set to Open By the Summer of 2015 - Courtesy of Switchyards

This area has always been a site of dreams getting real. From a rag-picker’s desire to have a home for his family to a technology incubator that launches design-centric brands for consumers. It’s 151 Spring Street, the soon-to-be Switchyards Building, a potential hub of consumer and design start-ups opening by the summer of 2015. “We’re naming the building the Switchyards Building and hope it’s named that for years to come,” wrote Michael Tavani, founder of Switchyards, in a recent email exchange. “A nod to classic names of buildings – named after the tenant. Switchyards’ mission is Made with Soul in Atlanta. We hope …continue reading

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